salesforce Tag

Checklist and pen with 3 checked boxes Sooner or later, in the Salesforce ecosystem, you will find yourself writing code to customize a Salesforce organization. There are plenty of references about the Apex programming language, which is Salesforce's Java-esque proprietary language for controllers and triggers. Of course, you'll follow general programming best practices. You'll also want to keep a few things top-of-mind about Salesforce coding.  

The Zeroth Law of Salesforce Coding

Outsource / In-House signpost with sky background The basics are in place: you've set up your Salesforce org, and you've customized it enough to let your sales team work pretty efficiently. Now your users are asking for more. They want more automation to streamline their work, more customization to tailor their experience to their needs, more built-in business logic to improve the quality of report data. How much of this can you realistically do in-house? Is it time to outsource Salesforce work for your organization?

Outsourcing, then and now

software workflow user laptop Now that you've implemented Salesforce and your team is reaping its benefits, it's time to step up your game. You're already rocking the CRM, streamlining the sales process, and using rich reports as feedback to keep on fine-tuning your sales machine. What's next? Your business processes. Here are some ways you can use Salesforce automation to improve business processes.

manage relationshipsPeople who work in nonprofit organizations want to spend their time and energy on their primary mission, not entering data into a database. Unfortunately, nonprofits really do need to use some kind of database to manage relationships with their donors and their beneficiaries. From a human perspective, managing donor relationships is not much different from managing customer relationships. Managing your contacts in a spreadsheet might work when you're just getting started, but you'll do much better if you use a true Customer Relationship Management (CRM) system. The Salesforce Foundation makes it possible for you to cultivate donor relationships for little or no cost.

Salesforce User Adoption, Part II: Improving Salesforce User Adoption

team all hands together Creating a great Salesforce app for your team is only part of the solution; the other part is getting your team to use the app. The best tool in the world is useless if it's not used! You've seen plenty of tips about signs your team has bought into using Salesforce. Your next step is improving Salesforce user adoption, and communication, training, and continuous refinement are the keys.

sorting and organizing Many companies use Salesforce not only for sales-related CRM but also for managing disparate business processes. Salesforce record types can help administrators fine-tune their orgs and manage business processes for different users effectively. Sometimes, administrators go a little overboard with custom record types. Even after reading the documentation, it can help to see how other admins utilize Salesforce record types. Here are some tips to help get you started.

Now that your company has rolled out its shiny new CRM system, you’ll want to make sure your team is fully on board. How can you track Salesforce user adoption? What are the signs you don’t have full buy-in from your organization on using Salesforce?Silhouette of many thumbs up Of course, there are many useful reports available in the Salesforce Adoption Dashboards. To get the most benefit from those dashboards and reports, you'll need to quantify your expectations. How should your team use the system?