solution design Tag

Monolith; Monolithic Rollout of Legacy System Conversion Legacy system conversion projects are always challenging. Rollout strategy can make a huge difference in successful user adoption and overall project success. Only when I began writing them down did I realize that I had recurring dreams.  I had believed that my dreams were largely random and varied, but instead I learned that I had many frequently recurring themes.  Similarly, the process of writing down my thoughts on software development has shown me that there are also recurring themes. One of these themes is the impact of rollout methodology on a project's success.  More specifically, rollouts of legacy system conversion projects.  Rollouts of brand new systems into an organization are typically less painful, as you are often automating a paper process, or inventing a new process that improves productivity.  However, legacy system conversions are almost always painful, as there are many processes that have emerged around this system.  People have developed a form of muscle-memory with the old system that even they themselves scarcely understand. We have successfully replaced dozens of legacy systems where everyone was happy and all was good with the world.  But it's not those projects I want to talk about.  I am going to talk about the projects where things went awry, because I don't want to make the same mistakes again.  Hopefully, these words will also help the reader to avoid similar problems in their projects.

Data Charts It's a funny thing about Salesforce developers. Many of us really dislike change, even when we know very well it's necessary and worthwhile. Why? Too often, changing an application is like re-routing plumbing after the house is built: making a change that looks small can take a whole lot of effort with a whole lot of risk for collateral damage.

DISCLAIMER - this article applies to mainly to Organizations without business analysts and programmers on staff. A few years ago, we were asked to quote a small automation for an existing, repeat client. They wanted help streamlining a spreadsheet-based process that took about 1/2 day of a high-level employee's time each week.

Client: Can you help us save some time by writing some Excel macros?

Susco: Of course we can develop some Excel macros for you. But first, why do you need them?